6 2016
Apr

Thirty, Entrepreneur(y), and Thriving: 5 Lessons I’ve Learned About Being a Female Entrepreneur [Part II]

This post is part 2 of a previous post that you can find here.

So let’s keep going, shall we? I shared the first two lessons I’ve learned as a female entrepreneur in my first post. Here are the final three!

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3. Failure always comes with an important lesson attached.

We all fail at things; it’s apart of life.

I’ve always thought failure is just important – if not more – than succeeding. Why? Because you always learn something from it.

Without failing, you’ll never know the true ecstasy of success. Without failing, you won’t learn how to problem solve and get yourself out of the situation. Without failing, you may not have been pushed to make – what ended up being – the right decision.

If you’ve failed at something, take a moment to feel the pain of it…but then put on your big girl pants and learn from it.

4. Being strong and powerful female role models to the next generation is not a right, it’s a privilege.

I recently met a Generation X woman who’s extremely passionate about helping the next generation – my generation. Her passion really made me think about the weight of that responsibility.

Then I realized…through coaching college girls, I’m also trying to do that very thing. I often think how I’m learning just as much – maybe more – from them as they are from me (as documented here, here, and here). But at the end of the day – and as I tell them – my goal is really to help them be the best people they can be. That means helping to mold strong, powerful, and confident women that can go out into the world and make a real difference.

It’s important to remember – and I often have to remind myself – that the responsibility of being a female role model is not a right, it’s an absolute privilege.

5. Above all, pursue balance.

Last, but what I would say most importantly, is that you pursue balance in your life as an entrepreneur.

All too often, I see business owners working themselves to the bone day and night to make their business work. While I 100% believe that hard work is apart of the equation, it doesn’t mean that you should be all work all the time.

I often imagine what I want my life to look like when I’m old and gray. Working myself to the bone and never having time for family, friends, and travel is not what I imagine.

So strike a balance: work hard at your business, but always leave room for yourself and the things that are important to you.


I’d love to hear about the lessons you’ve learned if you’re a female entrepreneur (or even a male one!). Let me know in the comment section below.

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